40+ Best Cheeses for Keto

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Written by Vanessa Roberts, Keto Expert and medically reviewed by Abby Courtenay

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Cheese is something just about everybody loves, even from a young age. Whether you’re open to experimenting with complex, stinky cheeses or prefer to walk on the mild side, the list of keto-friendly cheeses is almost infinite.

And flavor is not the only benefit! Cheese provides calcium, protein, fat, vitamins, minerals, and probiotics, which can contribute to healthy bones, teeth, muscles, metabolism, gut flora, and skin.

Here’s a quick look at over 20 common cheeses with less than 1 gram of net carbs per 1-ounce serving.

Browse through our full list of over 40 low-carb cheeses and check out their carb counts, flavor profiles, common uses, and more below.

 

Asadero

1.2 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is asadero cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-soft, chewy
  • Taste: mild
  • Color:  white or pale yellow
  • Origin: Chihuahua, Mexico
  • Name meaning: asadero comes from the Spanish verb asar, meaning to grill or to roast 
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Use: especially good for melting (hence the name), asadero cheese is commonly used in quesadillas, nachos, enchiladas, chiles rellenos, and Mexican fondue
  • Similar to: Oaxaca cheese, string cheese (texture)
  • Suitable substitutes: Oaxaca, Fontina, Monterey Jack, Muenster

 

Asiago

0 - 1 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g), depending on the brand

What is Asiago cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: medium to hard, based on whether it is fresh or aged. Small holes.
  • Taste: sweet and sour, creamy and buttery, nutty
  • Color: white or pale yellow 
  • Origin: Asiago, Italy
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Use:
    • Aged: grate and add to vegetable pasta, cauliflower risotto, salad
    • Fresh: cube and add to a charcuterie board, slice and use in sandwiches, melt on top of burgers or keto pizza
  • Suitable substitutes:
    • Aged: Parmesan, Pecorino Romano
    • Fresh: Swiss, mild Cheddar

 

Brie

0.1 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Brie and how do you use it?

  • Texture: soft, creamy
  • Taste: mild, buttery, earthy
  • Color: white rind, off-white or pale yellow inside
  • Origin: Brie, France
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Rind: edible
  • Note: traditional Brie cannot be sold in the US because it contains raw milk; alternative versions are available instead
  • Use: serve room temperature with keto crackers or bread, nuts, fruit, charcuterie; bake in the oven with rosemary or garlic
  • Similar to: Camembert, but softer and less intense

 

Burrata

0 - 1 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g), depending on the brand

What is burrata and how do you use it?

  • Texture: soft, creamy
  • Taste: milky, buttery
  • Color: white
  • Origin: Italy 
  • Name meaning: burrata means buttery in Italian
  • Made from: cow’s or water buffalo’s milk
  • Use: eat fresh, serve with cloud bread and tomatoes, basil, salad; or add to ketogenic pizza or pasta
  • Suitable substitutes: fresh mozzarella

 

Camembert

0.1 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Camembert and how do you use it?

  • Texture: soft, creamy
  • Taste: rich, buttery, milky
  • Color: white rind, pale yellow inside
  • Origin: Camembert, Normandy, France 
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Rind: edible
  • Note: Camembert de Normandie is banned in the US because it contains unpasteurized milk, but there are alternative types
  • Use: eat at room temperature on a charcuterie tray, bake with herbs
  • Similar to: Brie, but denser and earthier, more intense flavor and aroma

 

Caraway

0.9 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)*

What is caraway cheese and how do you use it?

Caraway seeds are added to different types of cheese for flavor (nutty with notes of anise or licorice, citrus, and pepper) and texture.

*Nutritional information may vary widely since different types of cheese are used. Most common caraway cheeses are Leyden (Leidse Kaas), Gouda, havarti, Cheddar, and Swiss.

 

Cheddar

0.7 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Cheddar cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: firm
  • Taste: can be mild or sharp (young vs. aged)
  • Color: can be white, yellow, or orange
  • Origin: Cheddar, Somerset, England (in the 12th century!)
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Use: serve with low-carb crackers or melt in grilled cheese sandwiches, keto mac and cheese, quesadillas, scrambled eggs, omelets
  • Suitable substitutes: Colby, Edam, Gouda

 

Cheshire

1.4 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Cheshire cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-hard, crumbly
  • Taste: salty, nutty, tangy
  • Color: white (original), red, or blue
  • Origin: England and Wales (region around Cheddar Gorge)
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Use: tasty on its own as a snack or part of a cheese board with fruit, also good for melting and used in recipes
  • Suitable substitutes: Wensleydale, Lancashire, sharp Cheddar

 

Colby

0.7 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Colby cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-hard
  • Taste: mild, buttery, creamy
  • Color: orange
  • Origin: Colby, Wisconsin, USA
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Use: table cheese, cube and eat with apple slices, also good for melting
  • Suitable substitutes: Monterey Jack, mild Cheddar

 

Colby Jack

0.5 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Colby Jack (also known as Cojack) and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-hard, soft and creamy texture
  • Taste: mild
  • Color: marbled white and orange
  • Origin: USA
  • Made from: Colby and Monterey Jack mixed together
  • Use: kid-friendly snack (mild taste), good for melting
  • Suitable substitutes: Colby, Monterey Jack, havarti

 

Cotija

1.1 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Cotija cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: crumbly
  • Taste: strong, salty, tangy
  • Color: white
  • Origin: Cotija, Michoacán, Mexico
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Note: does not melt
  • Use: crumble or grate and sprinkle on top of Mexican dishes like elotes (grilled corn), nachos, tacos, enchiladas, soups
  • Suitable substitutes: feta

 

Cottage cheese

1.3 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g) of the lowfat 2% variety

What is cottage cheese (also known as curds and whey) and how do you use it?

  • Texture: soft, a bit soupy, includes loose curds of different sizes
  • Taste: mild, slightly sour
  • Color: white
  • Origin: thought to be from ancient Mesopotamia
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Use: serve with salad, fruit, keto toast, or as a dip; can be used in cooking scrambled eggs, omelets, vegetable lasagna, quiche
  • Suitable substitutes: ricotta, mascarpone

 

Cream cheese

1.6 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is cream cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: soft, smooth, spreadable
  • Taste: mild but rich
  • Color: white
  • Origin: Chester, New York, USA
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Use: spread on keto crackers or bread; add to recipes like artichoke dip, cheesecake, pasta sauce,  soup
  • Suitable substitutes: cottage cheese, ricotta, mascarpone

 

Edam

0.4 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Edam and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-hard
  • Taste: light, mildly nutty and salt
  • Color: pale yellow
  • Origin: Edam, Netherlands
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Use: eat as a snack, paired with nuts or fruits like pear, cherry, melon, apricot, peach
  • Suitable substitutes: Gouda

 

Feta

1.1 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is feta and how do you use it?

  • Texture: firm, dry, crumbly
  • Taste: salty, tangy
  • Color: white
  • Origin: Greece
  • Name meaning: the Greek word feta comes from the Italian word fetta, meaning slice
  • Made from: sheep’s and goat’s milk
  • Use: crumble over salads, add to pasta or roasted vegetables, bake and serve with olives and tomatoes
  • Suitable substitutes: ricotta, goat cheese

 

Fontina

0.4 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Fontina cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-soft, smooth, often has small holes
  • Taste: buttery, nutty
  • Color: pale yellow  
  • Origin: Fontinaz, Italy
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Use: works well for melting or serving hot; use in low-carb pizzas, pastas, sauces, or sandwiches; bake and serve as a dip
  • Suitable substitutes: Gruyere, provolone, Gouda, Swiss

 

Goat / Chevre

0 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g) for soft variety, or 0.6 for aged type

What is goat cheese, also known as chèvre, and how do you use it?

  • Texture: Young: soft, creamy, spreadable. Aged: harder, drier, crumbly
  • Taste: tangy, tart
  • Color: white, turns more yellow when aged 
  • Origin: there are many different cheeses made with goat’s milk, going back thousands of years to when goats were first domesticated. Today, France is especially well known for its goat’s cheese, also called chèvre (meaning goat in French). 
  • Made from: goat’s milk
  • Use: Young type is often mixed with fresh herbs, also combines well with sweet fruit and honey. Delicious on salads, sandwiches, pizzas.
  • Suitable substitutes: cream cheese, ricotta, feta

 

Gorgonzola

1 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Gorgonzola and how do you use it?

  • Texture: can be soft and creamy or firm and crumbly
  • Taste: rich, creamy, salty, earthy
  • Color: white or pale yellow with green-blue veins or spots
  • Origin: Gorgonzola, Italy
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Use: delicious on its own, or in ketogenic pasta, pizza, salad, risotto
  • Suitable substitutes: Roquefort

 

Gouda

0.6 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Gouda and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-soft (harder as it ages)
  • Taste: mild, creamy, and slightly sweet, with aged versions becoming more rich and nutty
  • Color: white, getting darker as it ages for longer
  • Origin: Gouda, Netherlands
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Use: younger types (often come with a red wax coating) are ideal for melting and use in fondue, sandwiches, soups, and mac and cheese. All versions are good on a cheese board.
  • Suitable substitutes: Muenster, Gruyere, Monterey Jack

 

Gruyere

0.1 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Gruyère cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: hard with small holes
  • Taste: rich, creamy, nutty
  • Color: pale yellow
  • Origin: Gruyère, Switzerland 
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Use: best known for its use in fondue and French onion soup, this is an excellent cheese for melting in vegetable pasta or soup, and baked dishes like quiche; can also be eaten on its own as a snack with fruit and/or nuts.
  • Suitable substitutes: Swiss (Emmental), Jarlsberg, Fontina

 

Halloumi

1 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is halloumi cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-hard, rubbery when raw, crispy on the outside and melted on the inside when cooked
  • Taste: fresh, milky, salty, tangy
  • Color: white
  • Origin: Cyprus
  • Name meaning: halloumi comes from the Greek word almi, meaning salty water
  • Made from: sheep’s, goat’s, and/or cow’s milk
  • Use: halloumi is usually grilled or fried (although it is possible to eat it raw); combine with grilled vegetables, meats, or in wraps.
  • Suitable substitutes: paneer, feta

 

Havarti

1 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is havarti and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-hard, smooth, creamy, with small holes
  • Taste: mild, buttery, a bit sweet, slightly acidic
  • Color: cream or yellow
  • Origin: Denmark
  • Name meaning: Hanne Nielsen, the woman who invented havarti, named the cheese after her family’s farm
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Use: good for melting or served on a cheeseboard.
  • Suitable substitutes: Tilsit, Monterey Jack

 

Jarlsberg

0 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Jarlsberg cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-soft, smooth, rubbery, with large holes
  • Taste: mild, buttery, nutty
  • Color: pale or golden yellow  
  • Origin: Jarlsberg, Norway
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Use: commonly seen in hot and cold sandwiches and on cheese and charcuterie boards
  • Suitable substitutes: Swiss Emmentaler

 

Limburger 

0.1 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Limburger cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-soft, creamy¡
  • Taste: strong, meaty, grassy, mushroomy. More nutty and mild if you cut off the rind.
  • Color: creamy to pale yellow, with orange rind  
  • Origin: Belgium
  • Name meaning: from the Limburg province in Belgium
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Rind: edible, makes the flavor stronger
  • Noteable: its stinky smell; has the same bacterium that causes human body and foot odor
  • Use: goes well with other strong flavors like rye bread, onions, and mustard (called the Limburger sandwich); can be used in other sandwiches or served on its own
  • Suitable substitutes: Taleggio

 

Manchego

0 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Manchego cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-hard, becomes harder as it ages. Youngest to oldest: semi curado, curado, viejo. Has small holes.
  • Taste: buttery, sour, sweet, nutty, sharper with age
  • Color: white to yellow
  • Origin: La Mancha, Spain
  • Name meaning: Manchego means from the region of La Mancha
  • Made from: sheep’s milk
  • Rind: distinctive zigzag pattern based on traditional grass baskets used as a mould. Artisan cheeses may have an edible rind, but eating it is not generally recommended since it comes into contact with the outside world. The rind is sometimes made with artificial material like plastic or wax, which should not be eaten.
  • Use: enjoy on its own or include on a cheese board; pairs well with fruits, nuts, olives, and meats.
  • Suitable substitutes: Asiago, Pecorino Romano

 

Mascarpone

0 - 4 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g), highly variable depending on the brand

(this is higher than most cheeses, so check the label and limit your serving size)

What is mascarpone and how do you use it?

  • Texture: creamy, thick, velvety, spreadable
  • Taste: rich, creamy, slightly sweet
  • Color: white
  • Origin: Italy
  • Made from: cow’s milk (cream)
  • Use: add to sweet and savory recipes, like keto tiramisu, cannoli, or spinach dip
  • Suitable substitutes: ricotta, cream cheese

 

Monterey Jack

0 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Monterey Jack cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-hard
  • Taste: mellow, buttery
  • Color: white or pale yellow  
  • Origin: Monterey, California, USA
  • Name meaning: Franciscan friars named their cheese after Monterey, California, and local businessman David Jacks marketed the product.
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Notable: Monterey Jack is also known as just plain Jack. It can also be mixed with other flavors or cheeses to create Cheddar Jack, Colby Jack, and Pepper Jack.
  • Use: great for melting, common in Mexican dishes, grilled cheese sandwiches; also a popular snack food
  • Suitable substitutes: havarti, Gouda, Colby

 

Mozzarella

0.7 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g) - made with whole milk

What is mozzarella and how do you use it?

  • Texture: soft (fresh mozzarella balls), or semi-soft to firm
  • Taste: mild, refreshing
  • Color: white
  • Origin: Italy
  • Name meaning: comes from Italian word mozzare, which describes how the curd is stretched and cut into ball shapes
  • Made from: cow’s milk, sometimes mixed with goat’s milk, traditionally water buffalo’s milk (mozzarella di bufala)
  • Use: enjoy fresh with tomato and basil or in salads; add to low-carb pizza, risotto, lasagna, pasta
  • Suitable substitutes: burrata (similar to fresh ball mozzarella), or provolone for melting

 

Muenster

0.3 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Muenster cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-soft, smooth
  • Taste: mild, buttery, salty
  • Color: white or pale yellow with an orange or reddish rind
  • Origin: USA (inspired by Munster cheese made in present-day France)
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Rind: edible, can be made from mild paprika or vegetable coloring like annatto
  • Use: serve as an appetizer, also good for melting on burgers or sandwiches
  • Suitable substitutes: Monterrey Jack, Port Salut

 

Neufchatel

1 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Neufchâtel cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: soft, smooth, slightly grainy or crumbly, spreadable
  • Taste: salty, milky, slightly tangy
  • Color:  white
  • Origin: France
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Use: spread on bread or crackers, add to dips and sauces, use as a lower fat replacement for cream cheese
  • Rind: white, edible but adds sharper taste
  • Note: often sold in a heart shape
  • Suitable substitutes: cream cheese

 

Oaxaca

0 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Oaxaca cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-soft, stringy, chewy
  • Taste: mellow, creamy, buttery
  • Color: white
  • Origin: Oaxaca, Mexico
  • Made from: cow’s cheese
  • Use: good for melting, commonly used in quesadillas, enchiladas, and chiles rellenos; can also be shredded and sprinkled over soups, salads, tacos
  • Suitable substitutes: asadero, mozzarella, provolone

 

Paneer

1 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is paneer and how do you use it?

  • Texture: soft, spongy, crumbly
  • Taste: mild, milky, neutral
  • Color: white
  • Origin: Indian subcontinent
  • Name meaning: paneer comes from the Persian word panir, meaning cheese
  • Made from: cow’s or buffalo’s milk and an acid, like lemon juice or vinegar
  • Use: commonly cooked in Indian dishes like curries; does not melt
  • Note: heating paneer for too long can turn it hard and rubbery 
  • Suitable substitutes: halloumi, mild feta, tofu

 

Parmesan

0.9 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Parmesan cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: hard, dry, slightly gritty
  • Taste: sharp, fruity, nutty, slightly salty
  • Color: white
  • Origin: Parmesan is based on an Italian cheese called Parmigiano Reggiano, which has PDO (protected designation of origin in the European Union). Parmesan can be made in the USA and varies widely in quality, while Parmigiano Reggiano can only be made in certain regions of Italy and must follow strict protocols, guaranteeing its high quality.
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Use: grate over pasta, stir into risotto or soup, shave onto salads, eat on its own
  • Suitable substitutes: Pecorino Romano

 

Pepper Jack

0 - 1 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g), depending on the brand

What is Pepper Jack cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-soft
  • Taste: creamy, buttery, and spicy
  • Color: white or pale yellow with small pieces of red and green peppers
  • Origin: USA
  • Made from: Monterey Jack cheese combined with spicy peppers: jalapeño, serrano, and habañero
  • Use: include on a cheese board with fruit and crackers, or melt on hamburgers, sandwiches, quesadillas, or nachos
  • Suitable substitutes: Monterey Jack or havarti, but they will lack the spiciness

 

Port-Salut

0.2 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Port-Salut cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-soft, velvety, creamy, smooth
  • Taste: mild, slightly tangy
  • Color: pale yellow
  • Origin: France
  • Name meaning: Trappist monks named this cheese after their abbey Notre Dame du Port du Salut
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Rind: some versions will have an orange edible rind, others may be wrapped in inedible wax
  • Use: serve on a cheese plate with ketogenic crackers, bread, and fruit, or melt it on a low-carb pizza or sandwich
  • Suitable substitutes: havarti, Muenster

 

Provolone

0.6 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is provolone and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-hard
  • Taste: provolone dolce is mild and buttery, while the aged provolone piccante is more sharp, salty and flavorful
  • Color: white or pale yellow
  • Origin: Italy
  • Made from: cow’s or buffalo’s milk
  • Use: on deli trays, in a sandwich or panini, melted on keto pizzas or vegetable pastas
  • Suitable substitutes: Muenster, Edam, Fontina

 

Queso fresco

0.8 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is queso fresco and how do you use it?

  • Texture: soft, crumbly
  • Taste: mild, milky, slightly salty
  • Color: white
  • Origin: Mexico
  • Meaning: queso fresco means fresh cheese in Spanish
  • Made from: cow’s milk, sometimes combined with goat’s milk
  • Use: can reduce the spiciness of Mexican dishes, usually crumbled as a topping or garnish (does not melt)
  • Suitable substitutes: Cotija, feta

 

Ricotta

2.1 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g), whole milk

(this is higher than most cheeses, so watch your portion size)

What is ricotta cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: soft, thick, smooth, slightly grainy
  • Taste: creamy, mild
  • Color: white
  • Origin: Italy
  • Meaning: ricotta means recooked in Italian (was originally made using leftover whey from other cheeses)
  • Made from: usually cow’s milk, but can be made from other types
  • Use: in keto lasagna, ravioli, gnocchi, pancakes, cheesecake
  • Suitable substitutes: cottage cheese

 

Romano

1 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Romano cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: hard, crumbly
  • Taste: sharp, salty, tangy
  • Color: creamy white or pale yellow
  • Origin: Romano cheese is based on an Italian sheep’s cheese called Pecorino Romano (PDO, protected designation of origin)
  • Made from: usually cow’s milk
  • Use: good for grating, try sprinkling on vegetable pasta, salads, cooked veggies, and soup; also goes well on a cheese board
  • Suitable substitutes: Parmesan

 

Roquefort (blue cheese)

0.6 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Roquefort cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-hard, crumbly
  • Taste: rich, creamy, sharp, tangy
  • Color: white with blue veins  
  • Origin: Roquefort-sur-Soulzon, France
  • Made from: sheep’s milk
  • Note: traditional Roquefort is banned in the US due to the bacteria it contains
  • Use: good for making stuffed mushrooms, olives, or figs; add to cheese platters with fruit, crackers, and nuts; also delicious on a salad or burger or mixed into a cream or cheese sauce
  • Suitable substitutes: Gorgonzola, goat cheese

 

Swiss / Emmentaler

0.4 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Swiss or Emmentaler* cheese and how do you use it?

*The United States Department of Agriculture considers Swiss cheese and Emmentaler cheese to be the same. However, the product made in the US, or American Swiss, is different from the similar cheese made in Switzerland, called Emmental or Emmenthal, which has protected status in the European Union

  • Texture: firm, large holes
  • Taste: mild, sweet, nutty
  • Color: pale yellow
  • Origin: American Swiss cheese is based on the Emmental cheese from Switzerland
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Use: works well on a cheese plate or in sandwiches, pasta, and cheese sauces
  • Suitable substitutes: Fontina, Gouda, Cheddar

 

Tilsit

0.5 g net carbs per 1 oz (28 g)

What is Tilsit cheese and how do you use it?

  • Texture: semi-hard, soft and smooth, small holes
  • Taste: buttery, spicy undertones
  • Color: off-white, pale yellow  
  • Origin: Tilsit, East Prussia, German Empire (in present-day Russia) 
  • Made from: cow’s milk
  • Use: slice or cube and put it on a cheese plate or in a salad, eat with a brown bread, or melt into recipes
  • Suitable substitutes: havarti, caraway, Pepper Jack

 

Cheeses to avoid on keto

  • American slices or singles. These are highly processed and can’t legally be called cheese, although they may be called “processed cheese” or “cheese product.”
  • Velveeta is another highly processed product that the FDA does not allow to be marketed as cheese. (Ever wonder why it doesn’t have to be refrigerated?) Velveeta also has 2.7 g of net carbs per 1 ounce, which is more than most cheeses.
  • Store-bought queso or cheese dip also usually has a whole load of artificial ingredients, so ketogenic eaters are best off staying away, even if you can afford the carbs. Luckily, you can make your own by melting a few real cheeses together and adding ingredients like hot sauce, spicy peppers, tomatoes, green chiles, onions, and cilantro.
  • Pre-shredded cheese is also best to avoid for clean ketogenic eating because it usually contains preservatives to prevent clumping.

 

What to add to a keto charcuterie board

Take your cheese and meat platter to the next level! For a balance of flavors and splashes of color, try complementing your keto-approved cheeses with:

  • Nuts: pecans, walnuts, almonds, pistachios
  • Fresh fruit: pomegranate seeds, figs, raspberries, blackberries, strawberries, slices of apricot, plum, apple, pear… you will only be eating them in small quantities to harmonize with the other flavors, so even higher carb fresh fruits are okay. (Watch out for dried fruit and jams, which are much higher in sugars and carbs.)
  • Olives, pickles, marinated artichoke hearts, roasted red peppers